Tag Archives: God’s care


I desire, O Lord, to take on your yoke and to learn your secrets. Teach me to rejoice always, to pray without ceasing, and in everything to give thanks.
-Daily Prayers: A Classic Collection.

Prayer of the Day – October 19th

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Morning and Evening Devotional for August 4th


Morning Verse

“The people that do know their God shall be strong.” Daniel 11:32

Every believer understands that to know God is the highest and best form of knowledge; and this spiritual knowledge is a source of strength to the Christian. It strengthens his faith. Believers are constantly spoken of in the Scriptures as being persons who are enlightened and taught of the Lord; they are said to “have an unction from the Holy One,” and it is the Spirit’s peculiar office to lead them into all truth, and all this for the increase and the fostering of their faith. Knowledge strengthens love, as well as faith. Knowledge opens the door, and then through that door we see our Saviour. Or, to use another similitude, knowledge paints the portrait of Jesus, and when we see that portrait then we love Him, we cannot love a Christ whom we do not know, at least, in some degree. If we know but little of the excellences of Jesus, what He has done for us, and what He is doing now, we cannot love Him much; but the more we know Him, the more we shall love Him. Knowledge also strengthens hope. How can we hope for a thing if we do not know of its existence? Hope may be the telescope, but till we receive instruction, our ignorance stands in the front of the glass, and we can see nothing whatever; knowledge removes the interposing object, and when we look through the bright optic glass we discern the glory to be revealed, and anticipate it with joyous confidence. Knowledge supplies us reasons for patience. How shall we have patience unless we know something of the sympathy of Christ, and understand the good which is to come out of the correction which our heavenly Father sends us? Nor is there one single grace of the Christian which, under God, will not be fostered and brought to perfection by holy knowledge. How important, then, is it that we should grow not only in grace, but in the “knowledge” of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

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Evening Verse

“I smote you with blasting and with mildew and with hail in all the labours of your hands.” Haggai 2:17

How destructive is the hail to the standing crops, beating out the precious grain upon the ground! How grateful ought we to be when the corn is spared so terrible a ruin! Let us offer unto the Lord thanksgiving.

 Even more to be dreaded are those mysterious destroyers—smut, bunt, rust, and mildew. These turn the ear into a mass of soot, or render it putrid, or dry up the grain, 

and all in a manner so beyond all human control that the farmer is compelled to cry, 

“This is the finger of God.” Innumerable minute fungi cause the mischief, and were it not for the goodness of God, the rider on the black horse would soon scatter famine over the land. Infinite mercy spares the food of men, but in view of the act

ive agents which are ready to destroy the harvest, right wisely are we taught to pray, “Give us this day our daily bread.” The curse is abroad; we have constant need of the blessing. When blight and mildew come they are chastisements from 

heaven, and men must learn to hear the rod, and Him that hath appointed it.

Spiritually, mildew is no uncommon evil. When our wor

k is most promising this blight appears. We hoped for many conversions, a

nd lo! a general apathy, an abounding worldliness, or a cruel hardness of heart! Th

ere may be no open sin in those for whom we are labouring, but there is a deficiency of sincerity and decision sadly disappointing our desires. We learn from th

is our dependence upon the Lord, and the need of prayer that no blight may fall upon our work. Spiritual pride or sloth will soon bring upon us the dreadful evil, and only the Lord of the harvest can remove it. Mildew may even attack our own hearts, and shrive

l our prayers and religious exercises. May it please the great Husbandman to avert so serious a calamity. Shine, blessed Sun of Righteousness, and drive the blights away.

Morning and Evening.

Never Once


Never Once  (courtesy of Matt Redmond and the YouVersion Bible)

“Never once did we ever walk alone, never once did You leave us on our own. You are faithful, God you are faithful.”

One of the major themes running throughout the Bible is the faithfulness of God. He’s constantly constant, and always who He says He will be. Do a quick word-search through the Psalms, for example, and look for the words ‘faithful’ and ‘faithfulness’. You will find them appearing time and time again, as the psalmist seeks to remind himself of the steadfastness of His God- and sings praise in response.

It’s a thoroughly biblical thing therefore to concentrate on the faithfulness of God. But it’s also a much-needed thing in our society today. Our news is full every day of stories of unfaithfulness- whether it be politics, the world of finance, or stories of some relationship breakdown or sexual scandal. Sadly, we’re met daily with accounts of leaders and public figures not being the people they said they would be. People run out on each other, people mislead and cheat, and offer empty promises. And then, shining brightly above it all, is our God. He is the opposite of all this, and He is also the antidote to all this. He is the One who never leaves nor forsakes. The Psalmist wrote:

“Your love, Lord, reaches to the heavens, Your faithfulness to the skies.” (Psalm 36:5)

Elsewhere the Psalms proclaim:

“His faithfulness continues through all generations.” (Psalm 100:5)

Put these together and we see that the faithfulness of God is not only immense, but it is unending too- it never skips a generation or misses a beat. The God we worship and adore is immeasurable faithful, even to the very end.

Sunday School Discussion Guide for July 28


John 3:1-18 (NKJV)
1  There was a man of the Pharisees named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews.
2  This man came to Jesus by night and said to Him, “Rabbi, we know that You are a teacher come from God; for no one can do these signs that You do unless God is with him.”
3  Jesus answered and said to him, “Most assuredly, I say to you, unless one is born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.”
4  Nicodemus said to Him, “How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter a second time into his mother’s womb and be born?”
5  Jesus answered, “Most assuredly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God.
6  That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.
7  Do not marvel that I said to you, ‘You must be born again.’
8  The wind blows where it wishes, and you hear the sound of it, but cannot tell where it comes from and where it goes. So is everyone who is born of the Spirit.”
9  Nicodemus answered and said to Him, “How can these things be?”
10  Jesus answered and said to him, “Are you the teacher of Israel, and do not know these things?
11  Most assuredly, I say to you, We speak what We know and testify what We have seen, and you do not receive Our witness.
12  If I have told you earthly things and you do not believe, how will you believe if I tell you heavenly things?
13  No one has ascended to heaven but He who came down from heaven, that is, the Son of Man who is in heaven.
14  And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of Man be lifted up,
15  that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life.
16  For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.
17  For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved.
18  He who believes in Him is not condemned; but he who does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.


What must I do to be lost?


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Matthew 6:31-34 NIV

So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them. But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.

In what situation or circumstance does God abandon His care for us?


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Matthew 6:30-34 (NKJV)
30  Now if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is, and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will He not much more clothe you, O you of little faith?
31  Therefore do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’
32  For after all these things the Gentiles seek. For your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things.
33  But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you.
34  Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about its own things. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble.

Is it a sin not to trust?  Not to believe?

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Three words in this section point the way to victory over worry: (1) faith (Matt. 6:30), trusting God to meet our needs; (2) Father (Matt. 6:32), knowing He cares for His children; and (3) first (Matt. 6:33), putting God’s will first in our lives so that He might be glorified. If we have faith in our Father and put Him first, He will meet our needs.

Hypocrisy and anxiety are sins. If we practice the true righteousness of the kingdom, we will avoid these sins and live for God’s glory.

If God’s care is a luxury hotel, why do we complain about the accommodations?

God’s Care…for even the sparrow


The following was forwarded to me from Windborn Church Worship Coordinator, Alan Wemple.  It blessed me and I decided to share it with a broader audience.

While preparing for worship music this week I picked the popular hymn, “His Eye Is on the Sparrow”, as one of our pieces. As I read through the story behind the song in Robert J. Morgan’s “Then Sings My Soul”, I got really blessed and want to pass the encouragement along to you. Here is an excerpt of the origin of the song from the lyricist, Civilla Durfee Martin, wife of evangelist Dr. Walter Martin:
 
“Early in the Spring of 1905, my husband and I were sojourning in Elmira, New York. We contracted a deep friendship for a couple by the name of Mr. and Mrs. Doolittle-true saints of God. Mrs. Doolittle had been bedridden for nigh twenty years. Her husband was an incurable cripple who had to propel himself to and from his business in a wheel chair. Despite their afflictions, they lived happy Christian lives, bringing inspiration and comfort to all who knew them. One day while we were visiting with the Doolittles, my husband commented on their bright hopefulness and asked them for the secret of it. Mrs. Doolittle’s reply was simple: ‘His eye is on the sparrow, and I know He watches me.’ The beauty of this simple expression of boundless faith gripped the hearts and fired the imagination of Dr. Martin and me. The hymn “His Eye Is on the Sparrow” was the outcome of that experience.”
 
My prayer for all of us is that we will realize and appreciate His care for us!

July 26
“For we through the Spirit by faith wait for the hope of righteousness.” (Gal. 5:5, R. V.)
THERE are times when things look very dark to me—so dark that I have to wait even for hope. It is bad enough to wait in hope. A long-deferred fulfillment carries its own pain, but to wait for hope, to see no glimmer of a prospect and yet refuse to despair; to have nothing but night before the casement and yet to keep the casement open for possible stars; to have a vacant place in my heart and yet to allow that place to be filled by no inferior presence—that is the grandest patience in the universe. It is Job in the tempest; it is Abraham on the road to Moriah; it is Moses in the desert of Midian; it is the Son of man in the Garden of Gethsemane.
There is no patience so hard as that which endures, “as seeing him who is invisible”; it is the waiting for hope.
Thou hast made waiting beautiful; Thou has made patience divine. Thou hast taught us that the Father’s will may be received just because it is His will. Thou hast revealed to us that a soul may see nothing but sorrow in the cup and yet may refuse to let it go, convinced that the eye of the Father sees further than its own.
Give me this Divine power of Thine, the power of Gethsemane. Give me the power to wait for hope itself, to look out from the casement where there are no stars. Give me the power, when the very joy that was set before me is gone, to stand unconquered amid the night, and say, “To the eye of my Father it is perhaps shining still.” I shall reach the climax of strength when I have learned to wait for hope.—George Matheson.
Strive to be one of those—so few—who walk the earth with ever-present consciousness—all mornings, middays, star-times—that the unknown which men call Heaven is “close behind the visible scene of things.”

Streams in the Desert.

This is the entry today in the classic devotional, “Streams in the Desert.”  I like the first part, because we wait for “righteousness” even though we have the promise of it.  We are in a society that values self-sufficiency and we sense that there is still something left for us to do.  We temporarily forget that Jesus did it all and that we have no capability to match or outdo Christ‘s work on Calvary.

I have spent a lot of time considering Job and have concluded that he was the best example of faithfulness that I have ever come across.  He could have given in to hopeless despair, but instead utters that great proclamation, “Though He slay me, yet will I trust him!”  No matter how bad it was, and despite the chance of his plight getting worse, Job was putting it all on the line for God.

I know that we can be faithful to God without all the trials to get our attention, but we are so easily distracted by the trappings of this world.  I want to learn how to be a faithful servant without the added stimulus of needing a miracle in order to go on.  If I can truly pull this off, I can save myself a lot of grief.

My prayer for us today is that we will show more appreciation for God’s provision and be less selfish with what He gives us!  Only by sharing do we get the better portion of God’s provision, so God, make me an example of sharing: your Good News and your daily blessings.

Morning and Evening Devotional for July 24th


July 24

Morning Verse

“Stand still, and see the salvation of the Lord.” Exodus 14:13

These words contain God‘s command to the believer when he is reduced to great straits and brought into extraordinary difficulties. He cannot retreat; he cannot go forward; he is shut up on the right hand and on the left; what is he now to do? The Master’s word to him is, “Stand still.” It will be well for him if at such times he listens only to his Master’s word, for other and evil advisers come with their suggestions. Despair whispers, “Lie down and die; give it all up.” But God would have us put on a cheerful courage, and even in our worst times, rejoice in His love and faithfulness. Cowardice says, “Retreat; go back to the worldling’s way of action; you cannot play the Christian’s part, it is too difficult. Relinquish your principles.” But, however much Satan may urge this course upon you, you cannot follow it if you are a child of God. His divine fiat has bid thee go from strength to strength, and so thou shalt, and neither death nor hell shall turn thee from thy course. What, if for a while thou art called to stand still, yet this is but to renew thy strength for some greater advance in due time. Precipitancy cries, “do something. Stir yourself; to stand still and wait, is sheer idleness.” We must be doing something at once—we must do it so we think—instead of looking to the Lord, who will not only do something but will do everything. Presumption boasts, “If the sea be before you, march into it and expect a miracle.” But Faith listens neither to Presumption, nor to Despair, nor to Cowardice, nor to Precipitancy, but it hears God say, “Stand still,” and immovable as a rock it stands. “Stand still“;—keep the posture of an upright man, ready for action, expecting further orders, cheerfully and patiently awaiting the directing voice; and it will not be long ere God shall say to you, as distinctly as Moses said it to the people of Israel, “Go forward.”

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Evening Verse

“His camp is very great.”   Joel 2:11


Consider, my soul, the mightiness of 
the Lord who is thy glory and defence. He is a man of war, Jehovah is His name. All the forces of heaven are at His beck, legions wait at His door, cherubim and seraphim;, watchers and holy ones, principalities and powers, are all attentive to His will. If our eyes were not blinded by the ophthalmia of the flesh, we should see horses of fire and chariots of fire round about the Lord’s beloved. The powers of nature are all subject to the absolute control of the Creator: stormy wind and tempest, lightning and rain, and snow, and hail, and the soft dews and cheering sunshine, come and go at His decree. The bands of Orion He looseth, and bindeth the sweet influences of the Pleiades. Earth, sea, and air, and the places under the earth, are the barracks for Jehovah’s great armies; space is His camping ground, light is His banner, and flame is His sword. When He goeth forth to war, famine ravages the land, pestilence smites the nations, hurricane sweeps the sea, tornado shakes the mountains, and earthquake makes the solid world to tremble. As for animate creatures, they all own His dominion, and from the great fish which swallowed the prophet, down to “all manner of flies,” which plagued the field of Zoan, all are His servants, and like the palmer-worm, the caterpillar, and the cankerworm, are squadrons of His great army, for His camp is very great. My soul, see to it that thou be at peace with this mighty King, yea, more, be sure to enlist under His banner, for to war against Him is madness, and to serve Him is glory. Jesus, Immanuel, God with us, is ready to receive recruits for the army of the Lord: if I am not already enlisted let me go to Him ere I sleep, and beg to be accepted through His merits; and if I be already, as I hope I am, a soldier of the cross, let me be of good courage; for the enemy is powerless compared with my Lord, whose camp is very great.

Morning and Evening.

Lordship


Pastor Dustin Butler on “Not Worrying”

Windborn Church

The infinite, all wise, wholly other God, who is beyond us choose to love us. Vast are the attributes of God, and all that He is is for us. As the Lord Himself says in Jeremiah 31.3, “I have loved you with an everlasting love; I have drawn you with unfailing kindness.” That is who He is, He cannot help it. Of the many mysteries and wonders of salvation, a top consideration has to go to the reality that we can accept the love of the creator of the universe.

See our great and loving God has gone to great links to love us and then continues to reach out to us. He has sent His son, to put on our human flesh and die for us, and He continues to have His Spirit call us to Himself as the Holy Spirit reminds us of the love of Christ Jesus…

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